IMANTS TILLERS

The Museum of Contemporary Art is presenting with the Power Institute, the Australian premiere screening of the feature-length Imants Tillers documentary Thrown into the World, directed by Antra Cilinska of Juris Podnieks Studio, and the launch of the Imants Tillers’ new monograph, Journey to Nowhere.

The screening will be followed by a short Q&A with Professor Mark Ledbury and Imants Tillers.

5.45 – 8.30pm | 21 November 2018
Museum of Contemporary Art

*Please note that this event is sold out. Contact the MCA to go on the Waiting List.

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 Imants Tillers, Studio, Image Courtesy of Museum of Contemporary Art.

Imants Tillers, Studio, Image Courtesy of Museum of Contemporary Art.

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO

 Portrait of Maria Fernanda Cardoso by Janie Barrett, Courtesy of The Sydney Morning Herald.

Portrait of Maria Fernanda Cardoso by Janie Barrett, Courtesy of The Sydney Morning Herald.

A wonderful feature article on MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO in The Sydney Morning Herald today.

Quoted in the article, "I'm free. Being an artist for me is about freedom. I do anything I want. Any thought I have I can pursue. Nobody tells me what to do, only myself and my curiosity," she says.

Read the article here >

GUAN WEI

ARC ONE is delighted to present Chivalry, an exhibition of new paintings and sculptures by one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, Guan Wei.

An opening reception will be held on Wednesday 14 November, 6-8pm, with opening remarks by Claire Roberts.

Guan Wei is a storyteller. Throughout his more than 30-year art practice, his distinctive style
has combined Australian and Chinese influences to weave profound narratives of loss, migration, identity, colonisation, and place. Working across painting, sculpture and installation, he merges eastern and western philosophies, art histories, eras and empires, signs and symbols, to create imaginary cross-cultural realms that explore contemporary issues and hopes for a better world.

Guan Wei’s latest exhibition at ARC ONE Gallery presents three bodies of work: Chivalry, a suite of paintings laden with philosophical meaning; Mascot, playful bronze sculptures depicting humorously anthropomorphised mythical creatures; and the monumental Treasure Hunt, a major new tapestry woven by the Australian Tapestry Workshop.

In Chivalry, Guan Wei examines ideas of honour and virtue through a series of theatrical tableaux inspired by the Middle Ages. “I have been seeking new directions in my painting for many years”, says the artist, “exploring new possibilities and making breakthroughs from my existing style toward new territory. Quite unexpectedly, reading and learning about the knights of the Middle Ages was a turning point in me. I was mesmerised by their stories.” Utilising the flowing rhythm of Eastern ink painting, calligraphy, and sketching, Guan Wei brings the realm of medieval fantasy to life. Noble jousts, sword-fights, romantic adventures, and heroic gestures, play out across his canvases evoking ideals and values that were once used to navigate lives. In the face of increasing alienation, digitalisation, virtual reality, and global change, Chivalry invites us to reflect on our humanity.

Woven by Chris Cochius, Pamela Joyce, Jennifer Sharpe and Cheryl Thornton from the Australian Tapestry Workshop, Treasure Hunt is inspired by a large painted mural from Guan Wei’s exhibition Other Histories at the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney in 2006. Drawing on Chinese and European mythologies, the work considers ‘other’ histories and the intersection of Indigenous and colonial cultural narratives. Through the depiction of the oceans, islands and desert interiors, Guan Wei references navigation, exploration, migration and the influence of, and response to, globalisation.

Guan Wei was born 1957, Beijing, China, and lives and works in Beijing and Sydney. He has won many awards, including the 2015 Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize, Bendigo Art Gallery; Sulman Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2002; and was selected for the prestigious 2009 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award, National Gallery of Victoria. Solo exhibitions include: Cosmotheoria, White Box Art Center 798 Art District Beijing, 2017; Guan. Perspective, Scene Sense Art Gallery, Beijing, 2017; Salvation, ARC ONE Gallery 2016; Archaeology, ARC ONE Gallery, 2014; Spellbound, He Xiang Ning Art Museum, OCT Contemporary Art Terminal, Shenzhen, China, 2011; The Enchantment, ARC ONE Gallery, 2012; Other histories: Guan Wei’s fable for a contemporary world, Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, 2006– 07; Looking, Greene St Studio, New York, 2003; Zen Garden, Sherman Contemporary, Sydney, 2000; and Nesting, or the Art of Idleness 1989–1999, MCA, Sydney, 1999.

Major group exhibitions include: The Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition, AGNSW, Sydney, 2017; Closing the Distance, Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, Bundoora, Victoria, 2017; Borders, Barriers, Walls, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2016; Collaborative Witness: Artists responding to the plight of the refugee, University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, 2011; Shanghai Biennial, Shanghai Museum, China, 2010; 10th Havana Biennial, Cuba, 2009; The China Project, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2009; Handle with Care, Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Adelaide, 2008; Face Up: Contemporary Art from Australia, Hamburger Bahnhof Museum, Berlin, 2003–04; Sulman Prize Exhibition, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, 2002; Osaka Triennial, Japan, 2001; Man and Space, Kwangju Biennale, South Korea, 2000; Third Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1999.

In 2019 the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, will present a major installation of Guan Wei’s work, which will include his 18-metre-long multi-panelled painting, Feng Shui, and works from the MCA collection.

 Guan Wei,  Chivalry No. 11 , 2018, acrylic on linen, 180 x 140cm.

Guan Wei, Chivalry No. 11, 2018, acrylic on linen, 180 x 140cm.

 Guan Wei,  Chivalry No. 1 , 2018, acrylic on linen, 130 x 80cm.

Guan Wei, Chivalry No. 1, 2018, acrylic on linen, 130 x 80cm.

 Guan Wei, Chivalry No. 5, 2018, acrylic on linen, 130 x 180cm.

Guan Wei, Chivalry No. 5, 2018, acrylic on linen, 130 x 180cm.

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

 Honey Long & Prue Stent,  Rock Form III , archival pigment print, edition of 5, 72 x 108cm.

Honey Long & Prue Stent, Rock Form III, archival pigment print, edition of 5, 72 x 108cm.

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT are featured in issue 45 of Artist Profile, out today. 


The collaborative artists have written about their process: "As two friends who first started working together when we were sixteen years old, our artistic process sprung from a place of curiosity, impulse and desire. This sense of playfulness has become the foundational element with which we continue to work. Although precognitive at the time, we seemed to recognise a mutual desire to explore our female bodies, sexuality and surrounding natural environment as a way of feeling connected to the space we were occupying."

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PETER DAVERINGTON

PETER DAVERINGTON was interviewed on 2 November by ABC Sydney’s Christine Anu for her Evenings radio program. Peter had an in-depth conversation with Christine about The Raft of the CLAN, the work’s commission and unveiling at Parliament House, his practice, the meaning of the different elements within the work, and his beginnings as a graffiti artist.

You can listen to the interview here:

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO

Works from MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO's series 'It's Not Size That Matters, It Is Shape' have been included in the exhibition 'Digital Animalities: Rendering' at CONTACT Gallery in Toronto, Canada. The exhibition explores human animal interactions, with a focus on the evolving space of animality in contemporary digital culture.

The exhibition is now open and continues until 15 December.

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 Maria Fernanda Cardoso,  Intromitent organ of the Thelbunus mirabilis (Tasmanian harvestman) Opiliones  from the series  It’s not size that matters, it is shape , 2008-09, resin, glass, metal, 28 x 6 x 6cm.

Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Intromitent organ of the Thelbunus mirabilis (Tasmanian harvestman) Opiliones from the series It’s not size that matters, it is shape, 2008-09, resin, glass, metal, 28 x 6 x 6cm.

PHAPTAWAN SUWANNAKUDT

PHAPTAWAN SUWANNAKUDT's work is included in the Bangkok Art Biennale. Her installation 'Knowledge in Your Hands, Eyes and Minds' consists of a soundscape, herbal aroma and a hanging mirror, as well as murals and paper cutouts of Thai folklore characters.

The Bangkok Art Biennale continues until 3 February, 2019.

Review >

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 Phaptawan Suwannakudt,  Knowledge in Your Hands, Eyes and Minds , Installation View, Bangkok Biennale, 2018.

Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Knowledge in Your Hands, Eyes and Minds, Installation View, Bangkok Biennale, 2018.

JACKY REDGATE & ANNE ZAHALKA

 Jacky Redgate,  Light Throw (Mirror) #4 , 2009-10, C-Type phoograph (hand-printed from original negative), facemounted to UV perspex.

Jacky Redgate, Light Throw (Mirror) #4, 2009-10, C-Type phoograph (hand-printed from original negative), facemounted to UV perspex.

JACKY REDGATE and ANNE ZAHALKA are included in the exhibition Robyn Stacey: as still as life. Drawn from MGA's collection, Jacky Redgate and Anne Zahalka's works are part of an exploration of still life photographs, which place the genre and Robyn Stacey's work into context.

The exhibition opens 24 November and continues until 3 March 2019.

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PETER DAVERINGTON

 Peter Daverington,  Portrait of Rafael Bonachela , 2018, oil on canvas, 199 x 153cm.

Peter Daverington, Portrait of Rafael Bonachela, 2018, oil on canvas, 199 x 153cm.

Congratulations PETER DAVERINGTON for his selection as a finalist in the 2018 Doug Moran National Portrait Prize with his stunning portrait of Rafael Bonachela, the director of the Sydney Dance Company. 

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CYRUS TANG

 Cyrus Tang,  A Simple Life (118) , 2018, archival pigment print, 65 x 65cm.

Cyrus Tang, A Simple Life (118), 2018, archival pigment print, 65 x 65cm.

Congratulations CYRUS TANG!

Cyrus Tang received the Colour Factory Honourable Mention for her work 'A simple life (118 minutes)', 2018 from her series 'Golden hour', as part of the William & Winifred Bowness Photography Prize.

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HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT | CYRUS TANG

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT and CYRUS TANG have been selected as finalists in the Josephine Ulrick and Win Schubert Photography Award 2018. The winner of the art price will be announced on 19 October, and an exhibition with the finalists will open on 20 October and run until 25 November at HOTA in the Gold Coast.

For more information, click here.

  Honey Long & Prue Stent ,  Salt Pool , 2018, Archival pigment print, 106 x 157 cm

Honey Long & Prue Stent, Salt Pool, 2018, Archival pigment print, 106 x 157 cm

ANNE ZAHALKA

ANNE ZAHALKA will be part of Civilization: The Way We Live Now, a major photography exhibition at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Korea (MMCA). The exhibition, which comprises over 300 works depicting life in the 21st century, will be open from 18 October to 17 February 2019, and will then travel to different art institutions around the world, including the National Gallery of Victoria.

Zahalka will be showing her Open House series from 1995.

To view Zahalka’s Open House series, click here.

For more information, click here.

  Anne Zahalka ,  Sunday, 2:09 , 1995, Duratran and Light Box, 125 x 190 x 25 cm

Anne Zahalka, Sunday, 2:09, 1995, Duratran and Light Box, 125 x 190 x 25 cm

PETER DAVERINGTON

 Peter Daverington, Wall Street, 2018, Oil and Acrylic on canvas, 198 x 152 cm.

Peter Daverington, Wall Street, 2018, Oil and Acrylic on canvas, 198 x 152 cm.

New York-based Australian artist Peter Daverington returns to ARC ONE with an exhibition of new paintings, titled Surface Zero.

A contemporary artist with a rare mastery of oil techniques, Peter Daverington’s practice centres on his unparalleled capacity to work across a wide range of pictorial languages and artistic styles. With a foundation in graffiti and street art, his oeuvre critically engages with legacies of Western art history from a contemporary context; seamlessly integrating a vast array of disparate images, styles and references in an aesthetic maximalism relevant to our time.

In Surface Zero, Daverington forces together opposing attitudes in art to consider the potential of images as zones of conflict. A clash of viewpoints, opinions, and perspectives plays out across his layered canvases as hard-edge abstraction, classical figuration and Romantic landscape painting are severely juxtaposed in a heady aesthetic mélange.

Surface Zero is a disaster point of explosive force. Landscapes by the great Hudson River School painter Albert Bierstadt, and figurative works by the Flemish Baroque artist Peter Paul Rubens, have been deftly appropriated, with the brushwork, colour, and technique reflecting the originals as closely as possible. Bright, geometric, hard-edge line work interrupts these representational paintings creating a tension within the pictorial space between formalism and figuration. For Daverington, this interlocking of clashing styles is “a reflection on twenty-first century disorientation,” it is “like looking at life from multiple viewpoints simultaneously – whether different points in history, different cultures, different perspectives and so on. I like the stark contrasts of life, the very natural struggle between viewpoints and opinions. The only way I can express this is by trying to compress a wide range of pictorial languages to capture the bewildering spectacles of being human and of life itself.”

Peter Daverington (b. 1974, Melbourne, Australia) has held more than sixty group and solo exhibitions in Australia, Europe, the Americas, and Asia since 2003. In 2006 Daverington completed an MFA at the Victorian College of the Arts where he received the prestigious KPMG tutorship to teach in the painting department. He has received two Australia Council for the Arts project grants, in 2005 and 2010 respectively; the John Coburn Emerging Artist Award in 2008, and the Rupert Bunny Fellowship in 2011 for his first moving image work. Solo exhibitions include Daverington does de Chirico, Susan Boutwell Gallery, Munich (2017); Before the Apocalypse, Shanghai Mass Art Centre, Shanghai (2016); Iconophilia, The Lodge Gallery, New York (2015); Lacuna, Chasm Gallery, Brooklyn, New York (2015); and Weltlandschaft (2016), Because Painting (2014), From the Future with Love (2013), and Poiesis (2011), all ARC ONE Gallery, Melbourne. Recent group exhibitions include Latent Content Analysis, The Lodge Gallery, New York (2017); The Oasis, Gitler_& Gallery, New York; Divine Abstraction, Justin Art House Museum, Melbourne (2016); Lurid Beauty: Australian Surrealism and its Echoes, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2015-16); The Garden, QUT Museum, Brisbane (2015); 100 Little Deaths, Bravin Lee Programs, New York (2013); Peekskill Project V, Hudson Valley Centre of Contemporary Art, Peekskill, New York (2013); and Currents 2012 & 2014 – Santa Fe International New Media Festival, Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has been shortlisted for numerous prestigious art awards including the Moran Prize (2018), the Archibald Prize and the Sulman Prize (2014 and 2013); the Fleurieu Art Prize, (2013); and the Geelong Contemporary Art Prize (2012). His work has been acquired by several major collections, including Artbank, KPMG, MacQuarie Bank, Geelong Gallery and Gippsland Art Gallery, as well as private collections throughout Australia and abroad.

Peter Daverington lives and works in New York.

IMANTS TILLERS

 Imants Tillers,  Fiction of Place , 2018, synthetic polymer paint, gouache on 132 canvas-boards nos. 106258- 106389, 279.4 x 426.72 cm.

Imants Tillers, Fiction of Place, 2018, synthetic polymer paint, gouache on 132 canvas-boards nos. 106258- 106389, 279.4 x 426.72 cm.

ARC ONE is delighted to present Imants Tillers’ latest exhibition, Joy Knows No Mercy, across two locations: ARC ONE Gallery
(4 September – 6 October) and Sydney Contemporary (13 – 16 September).

As one of Australia’s most important living artists, Imants Tillers has been at the forefront of conceptual painting for over four decades. Since his first solo exhibition in 1973, he has forged a reputation as a rigorously intellectual and sophisticated artist with a singular visual language. Tillers juxtaposes layers of complex art historical, political, literary, personal, and philosophical references to create thought-provoking works that explore themes relevant to contemporary culture, identity, displacement, assimilation, and distance.

In Joy Knows No Mercy, Tillers employs his signature modular formations of small canvas-boards to form a series of profound and expansive tableaux. The monumental Fiction of Place (2018) is the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the culmination of the artist’s Metafisica Australe series, an important chapter that explores the remarkable aesthetic connection between certain aspects
of contemporary Western Desert painting and European art. Tillers has based this large 132
panel work on Francesco Guardi’s Venetian scene, Bucentaur Departing for the Lido (c. 1775-80). However, what appears to be the sky is an appropriated section of Papunya Tula artist, Kenny Williams Tjampitjinpa’s, Kuniya Dreaming at Karriwarra (2004) which denotes a Western Desert landscape in Central Australia. Simultaneously, the interrelation of the colours and stylised zigzag patterning here evokes a de Chirico-esque rendering of water or a Post-Impressionist sky. As Tillers asserts, Fiction of Place “depicts the collision (or maybe the reconciliation) of the two worlds: the Aboriginal and the European.” This is a concept explored throughout much of his oeuvre.

The sources of Tillers’ imagery are significant. In Joy Knows No Mercy, Tillers references European artists and writers such as Guardi, de Chirico, Odilon Redon, Hilma af Klint, Stéphane Mallarmé, and Phillip Otto Runge. He has then juxtaposed these references against works by Australian and New Zealander artists such as Arthur Streeton, John Glover, Colin McCahon,
and Julian Daspher, acknowledging that distant, provincial cultures depend on imports from dominant cultures for much of their artistic inspiration and imagery. This layering of text and art references has become a powerful visual language for Tillers in his exploration of distance and issues of locality and identity, and constitutes a key feature of his practice, the ever unfolding Book of Power.

Imants Tillers has exhibited widely since the late 1960s, and has represented Australia at important international exhibitions, such as the Sao Paulo Bienal in 1975, Documenta 7 in 1982, and the 42nd Venice Biennale in 1986. Major solo surveys of Tillers’ work include Journey to Nowhere, Latvian Museum of Art, Riga (2018); Imants Tillers: works 1978–1988 at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (1988); Imants Tillers: 19301, at the National Art Gallery, Wellington (1989); Diaspora, National Art Museum, Riga, Latvia (1993); Diaspora in Context at the Pori Art Museum, Pori (1995); Towards In nity: Works by Imants Tillers, Museum of Contemporary Art (MARCO) in Monterrey, Mexico (1999); and in 2006 a major retrospective of his work, Imants Tillers: one world many visions, was held at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

Tillers was the winner of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ Wynne Prize for landscape painting for two consecutive years (2012-2013). He has received numerous awards and commissions, such as the Osaka Triennale Prize (Gold in 1993, Bronze in 1996, and Silver in 2001), and the inaugural Beijing International Art Biennale Prize for Excellence (2003).

GUAN WEI

 Guan Wei,  Feng Shui  (detail), 2004, acylic on composite board, Museum of Contemporary Art, donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by Cromwell Diversified Property Trust, 2017

Guan Wei, Feng Shui (detail), 2004, acylic on composite board, Museum of Contemporary Art, donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by Cromwell Diversified Property Trust, 2017

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney has announced its 2019 exhibition program, with a major installation by GUAN WEI.

In October 2019, the Museum of Contemporary Art will present 'Feng Shui', an immense 18-metre-long multi-panelled painting by Guan Wei. 'Feng Shui' will be presented alongside two of Guan Wei’s key 1989-90 series of works on paper, from the Collection.

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JANET LAURENCE

 Portrait of Janet Laurence

Portrait of Janet Laurence

The Museum of Contemporary Art Australia has announced its 2019 exhibition program, with a major solo exhibition by Janet Laurence.

In March, Janet Laurence, one of Australia’s key creative minds, will present After Nature, a major mid-career survey exhibition examining the critical issues facing the environment and the natural world. The exhibition will feature work from throughout her oeuvre, as well as a selection of new works.

For many years, my work has explored the poetics of space and materiality through the creation of site-specific works that deal with our experiential and cultural relationship with the natural world.  – Janet Laurence, 2018

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PETER DAVERINGTON

PETER DAVERINGTON’s major commission The Raft of the Clan will be launched 22 October at The Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra, and officially launched by former Prime Minister Julia Gilliard AC.

Commissioned by CLAN, Care Leavers Australasia Network,the artwork celebrates the remarkable triumph of Care Leavers who endured cruel and abusive childhood in Australia’s Orphanages, Children’s Homes, Missions & Foster Care that were run by State Governments, Churches and Charities.

 Peter Daverington,  Raft of the Clan , oil and enamel on canvas, 260 x 397cm.

Peter Daverington, Raft of the Clan, oil and enamel on canvas, 260 x 397cm.

PAT BRASSINGTON

PAT BRASSINGTON's work A's Joy has been featured on the cover of the book, 'The Mummy’s Foot and the Big Toe: Feet and Imaginative Promise'. In this book Alan Krell addresses the absurd, the abject, the banal and the romantic, as he describes the appearance of the foot in literature, photography, art and film.

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 Pat Brassington, A's Joy, 2005, pigment print, 84 x 62cm.

Pat Brassington, A's Joy, 2005, pigment print, 84 x 62cm.

JANET LAURENCE

 Janet Laurence,  What Colour is the Sacred? (Black)  (detail), 2018, plywood, acrylic, mirror, details of Karel Dujardin ‘Self-portrait’ 1662 printed on archival cotton rag, Oil glaze on acrylic, Carbon, bone, charcoal, ink, pigment, scientific glass, Barite, Goethite, Hematite, 45 x 60 x 45cm.

Janet Laurence, What Colour is the Sacred? (Black) (detail), 2018, plywood, acrylic, mirror, details of Karel Dujardin ‘Self-portrait’ 1662 printed on archival cotton rag, Oil glaze on acrylic, Carbon, bone, charcoal, ink, pigment, scientific glass, Barite, Goethite, Hematite, 45 x 60 x 45cm.

JANET LAURENCE has been invited to speak at 'Between Subjects and Collectiveness' at INHOTIM Institute, Brazil on 13 September 2018. The 4th International Education Seminar at Inhotim is focused on transformations subjects go through and their relationship with the environment in which they live. With guests from Brazil, Argentina, Austria, Chile, Colombia, India and Russia, the seminar proposes a reflection on the separation between the social and environmental dimension in contemporary life.

Panel Discussion 13 September | How can art question subject –environment relations?

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JOHN YOUNG, HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

‘Oceans from here’ at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney is currently on view. Featuring the work of JOHN YOUNG and HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT, the exhibition explores the aesthetics of water, and its ebb and flow as a global life force. John Young says of his work (above): "Nature is not only fragile, majestic and sublime in the old Kantian sense - but, as Virilio would have it, the ocean may well be frightful and monstrous in its answering back to the anthropocentric progressiveness of modernity’s folly".

The exhibition continues until 20 October.

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 John Young,  Ancient Water I , 2018, Glicee print on archival Museo Silver Rag Paper, 73 x 126.5cm.

John Young, Ancient Water I, 2018, Glicee print on archival Museo Silver Rag Paper, 73 x 126.5cm.