JANET LAURENCE

Janet Laurence, photographed in her studio by Jacquie Manning.

Janet Laurence, photographed in her studio by Jacquie Manning.

JANET LAURENCE is interviewed in this month's issue of Vogue Living, where she discusses her MCA show 'After Nature' and her past and present work.

In the article Janet delves into her formative time at an Italian art school in the 70s, her job as a flying artist with Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, and the discordance between European agricultural practices and the Australian landscape.

"[The alarming thing was that our approach] to art was the exactly same approach to farming - people just applied a European perception to the landscape. They didn’t actually look at it how it was, but they were just painting it through the eyes of a European Impressionist. So that was kind of funny and I realised that we can’t see what this place is. So, then I just decided I wanted to start exploring it a bit more and art was a great means for doing that," Laurence says.

'After Nature' continues at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia until 10 June.

Read the full article here >

JACKY REDGATE

Jacky Redgate,  Untitled , 1991, cardboard, paper, 27 x 27 x 27 cm

Jacky Redgate, Untitled, 1991, cardboard, paper, 27 x 27 x 27 cm

JACKY REDGATE is showing work in the exhibition 'IN-Formalism' at the @casulapowerhouse

'IN-Formalism' witnesses the evolution of abstract non-objective art in Australia from 1968. The exhibition surveys the key generation of artists who have contributed to the ongoing language of abstract art. It presents these works alongside a wide range of artefacts in design, textiles, advertising, urban design, film and performance and reveals the influence this art-form had in our times.

The exhibition opens today and continues until 30 June.

More information >

ANNE ZAHALKA

Anne Zahalka’s mother, Hedy (right), and friend, Prague, Czechoslovakia

Anne Zahalka’s mother, Hedy (right), and friend, Prague, Czechoslovakia

Hedy Zahalka's image recreated by Alice Zahalka and Sophie Wild, 2018

Hedy Zahalka's image recreated by Alice Zahalka and Sophie Wild, 2018

ANNE ZAHALKA is exhibiting contemporary street photography alongside photographs from the mid-20th century at the Museum of Sydney's exhibition Street Photography: 1930s - 1960s.

Commercial street photographers were a familiar sight on Sydney's streets, capturing everyday people as they strode by or stopped to pose. Taken against the vibrant background of the city streets, these photographs captured candid moments in the lives of millions of people, from uniformed servicemen and women to postwar migrants exploring their new city and young couples out for a day on the town. Following a hugely successful public call-out, the exhibition draws together photos from hundreds of private family albums. This extraordinary, largely unseen record of Sydney and its people is displayed alongside contemporary photography by Zahalka, capturing people on the streets of Sydney today. 

The exhibition has been so well received that it is shortlisted for MAGNA's Best Temporary/Travelling Exhibition 2019. It continues until 21 July.

Click here to see a short video on Anne’s inspiration behind the exhibition; here for an interview with Anne; and here for exhibition details.

PETER DAVERINGTON

Peter Daverington,  Space is the Place , 2019, oil and gold leaf on canvas, 198 x 152cm

Peter Daverington, Space is the Place, 2019, oil and gold leaf on canvas, 198 x 152cm

Congratulations to PETER DAVERINGTON, whose work Space is the Place is a finalist for the Nillumbik Prize for Contemporary Art, a biannual acquisitive art prize open to emerging and established artists working in any medium across Australia. The Prize is presented in association with Montsalvat Arts Centre.

The finalist exhibition opens on 30 May at the Barn Gallery Montsalvat, and runs until 21 July.

More information >

IMANTS TILLERS

Imants Tillers,  All hail Greg Inglis,  2019, synthetic polymer paint and gouache on 64 canvasboards, 242 x 242 cm overall.

Imants Tillers, All hail Greg Inglis, 2019, synthetic polymer paint and gouache on 64 canvasboards, 242 x 242 cm overall.

IMANTS TILLERS is a finalist in the 2019 Archibald Prize with his portrait of rugby league legend Greg Inglis. Congratulations Imants!

”Many artists, writers, actors and other cultural workers secretly follow sport,” says Imants Tillers. “I was recently delighted to learn that Tracey Moffatt follows the South Sydney Rabbitohs (co-owned by Russell Crowe). I have also been a supporter since 1965, when as a 15-year-old I attended the legendary grand final between South Sydney and St George. To witness Greg Inglis in full flight, equipped with a fend that could stop a freight train, is to see poetry in motion. Thou majestic!

But there is far more to Greg Inglis than being an elite Indigenous athlete. He is a hero and role model to Indigenous communities all around Australia, and a community leader of enormous influence. His great act of grace is to engage with these communities. He teaches children and adolescents how to avoid drugs, alcohol and violence and how to adapt to the many other challenges that these disadvantaged children and adolescents face. Every human being is the greatest work of art ever created. He brings hope and a sense that anyone, despite everything, can be master of their own destiny. All hail Greg Inglis!”

ANNE ZAHALKA

Anne Zahalka,  The Mallee, near Benetook in Sunraysia Region of Victoria , 2019, archival pigment ink on rag paper, 80cm x 80cm. Source: Museums Victoria.

Anne Zahalka, The Mallee, near Benetook in Sunraysia Region of Victoria, 2019, archival pigment ink on rag paper, 80cm x 80cm. Source: Museums Victoria.

ARC ONE Gallery is delighted to present Wild Life, Australia, a new body of work by one of Australia’s preeminent artists, Anne Zahalka.

The term Anthropocene describes an ecological turning point where the impact of human behaviour has significantly and permanently affected our planet, contributing to drastic changes on climate and the environment. In response, Anne Zahalka presents Wild Life, Australia, a reimagining of early Australian dioramas from natural history museums that mark out unsettling ethical and environmental issues in this country. Re-working these contrived ‘habitats’ to acknowledge First Nations people and the impact of colonisation, Zahalka reflects on the permanent altering of the Australian environment within the age of the Anthropocene.

Habitat displays and dioramas have been part of natural history museums since at least the late nineteenth century. Intended to educate museum visitors about native flora and fauna, these displays present pristine environments, frozen in time, devoid of man-made issues. By digitally inserting traces of reality into this idealised, optimistic imagery, Zahalka subverts these fixed narratives and reflects on the changing relationship that exists between people and the natural world. Working with conservationists, curators and photographers in the field of birds, bats, marsupials, mammals and amphibians, Zahalka has identified original habitat locations and incorporated new data to set out alternative and contemporary ways to view these landscapes.

Anne Zahalka,  Fruit Bat, Nepean River, Sydney Region of New South Wales , 2019, archival pigment ink on rag paper, 98cm x 80cm. Source: Museums Victoria.

Anne Zahalka, Fruit Bat, Nepean River, Sydney Region of New South Wales, 2019, archival pigment ink on rag paper, 98cm x 80cm. Source: Museums Victoria.

In this exhibition, Zahalka digitally disrupts, hand-colours, and evolves archival photographs of historic Australian habitat displays so they become bearers of contemporary meanings and inferences. Birds ingest plastic with devastating results, planes and helicopters slash across painted skies, waterholes are drained, heat exhausted fruit bats fall from trees, bushfires blaze, housing developments invade, and cars and buses scar the landscape. Based on current science and the damaging carbon footprint left by tourism, industry, and population growth, the digital interventions within these re-imagined displays are pointers to the ongoing negative impact humans have had on the natural world and the need to take action.

With a career spanning more than three decades, Anne Zahalka is one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists. She has exhibited widely since the 1980s, nationally and internationally. Zahalka’s work has featured extensively in major exhibitions, including Civilization: The Way We Live Now, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Korea, Gwacheon, South Korea (2018); The Photograph and Australia, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2015); Mix Tape 1980s: Appropriation, Subculture, Critical Style, National Gallery of Victoria (2013); Things – Photographing the constructed world, curated by Helen Ennis, National Library of Australia; Three Australian Photographers: Bill Henson, Tracey Moffatt, and Anne Zahalka, GEM/ Fotomuseum, Den Haag, Netherlands (2007); Leisureland, Australian Embassy in Washington (2007); and Fieldwork: Australian Art 1968 – 2002, National Gallery of Victoria (2002).

Select recent solo exhibition include Street Photography, Sydney Living Museums, Museum of Sydney (2019); The Fate of Things: Memory objects and art, with Sylvia Griffin, Sydney Jewish Museum (2019); The Landscape Revisited, MAMA Murray Art Museum, Albury NSW (2017); Anne Zahalka: Playground of the Pacific, Manly Art Gallery & Museum, Sydney (2016); Parliament House at Work, 25th Anniversary commission, Parliament House, Canberra (2014); Anne Zahalka: A Case Study, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery (2013).

Anne Zahalka’s work is held in many public and private collections including the National Gallery of Australia; Art Gallery of New South Wales; National Portrait Gallery; Australian Bicentennial Collection; National Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand; Parliament House Collection; National Gallery of Victoria; Sir Elton John Collection; Deutsche Bank Collection; International Polaroid Collection, USA; Visart, New York; and numerous other regional galleries, universities and private collections in Australia and abroad.

This exhibition is part of CLIMARTE’s ART+CLIMATE=CHANGE 2019 - a socially-engaged festival of climate change related arts and ideas featuring curated exhibitions and theatre works alongside a series of keynote lectures, events and public forums featuring local and international guests. www.artclimatechange.org.au.

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

Honey Long & Prue Stent, 'Dust Flood', 2018, archival pigment print, 72 x 108 cm

Honey Long & Prue Stent, 'Dust Flood', 2018, archival pigment print, 72 x 108 cm

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT have four works featured in the 'Eyes on Main Street' Wilson Outdoor Photo Festival.

The festival sees the main street of historic downtown Wilson, North Carolina, transformed into a vibrant gallery of large-scale photographs. For 100 days, 100 photographs will be displayed on 100 storefront windows, spanning seven city blocks. Now in it's fifth edition, the 2019 festival is focussing on the theme 'A Crossroad of Cultures' and showing work from 45 countries with an equal number of male and female artists. 

More information >

PETER DAVERINGTON

Image courtesy of the artist.

Image courtesy of the artist.

PETER DAVERINGTON has recently completed a 55-metre-long wall mural in Queens, New York.

Commissioned by The National Audubon Society and Durst Organisation, the mural features the American Black Duck, a species native to New York that is being threatened by the effects of climate change. The project is part of the Audubon Mural Project, an undertaking inspired by Audubon scientists' 2014 Birds and Climate Change Report, which concluded that over half of American bird species are under threat.

The mural's bright, sunset-coloured blues and oranges stretch out along the wall while a male and female duck float along the gradient, just as the species is often spotted doing in the East River.

More information >

ROBERT OWEN | HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

Congratulations to ROBERT OWEN and HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT on being selected as finalists of the Deakin University Contemporary Small Sculpture Award 2019.

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, this annual acquisitive award and exhibition is organised by the Art Collection and Galleries Unit at Deakin University. One work will be awarded $10,000 and become part of the Deakin University Art Collection. The winner will be announced at the opening of the exhibition of finalists’ work on Wednesday 29 May 2019. The finalist exhibition will continue until 12 July.

More information >

Robert Owen, 'Shadow Caster 2', 2019, painted stainless steel, 65 x 69 x 62 cm

Robert Owen, 'Shadow Caster 2', 2019, painted stainless steel, 65 x 69 x 62 cm

Honey Long & Prue Stent,  Field Sip XIII,  2018, blown glass, water sample, rock

Honey Long & Prue Stent, Field Sip XIII, 2018, blown glass, water sample, rock

GUO JIAN

Guo Jian, 'The Day Before I Went Away' ,  2004, oil on canvas, 213 x 152 cm

Guo Jian, 'The Day Before I Went Away', 2004, oil on canvas, 213 x 152 cm

On Thursday 2 May at 6pm, GUO JIAN will speak at ACMI on a panel exploring censorship, restrictions, and the creativity that emerges in resistance.

Guo Jian's art practice has been fuelled by his position as a reflective, sharply satirical Chinese expatriate who grew up during the Cultural Revolution and under a deeply communist regime. His early experiences of art were inevitably entwined with communist authority, ideology and militaristic power. Guo Jian's first acquaintance with art was time spent as a propaganda-poster painter for the People’s Liberation Army then later, as an art student in Beijing, he took part in the protests which led to the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. 

Reserve tickets here >

EUGENIA RASKOPOULOS

Image: courtesy of Power Publications

Image: courtesy of Power Publications

Eugenia Raskopoulos: Vestiges of the Tongue is the first monograph documenting three decades of work from the photo-media artist, exploring themes of gender, migration and globalisation, and the ways they shift between our eyes and our tongues. Co-published by Formist and Power Publications, this is a beautifully crafted book and an important recognition of Raskopoulos' pioneering practice.

To mark the special occasion of this book launch, Carriageworks is hosting a panel on Tuesday 16 April 6 - 8.30pm. Hear from Raskopoulos as well as selected contributors to the publication and curators of 'The National' as they discuss how art can navigate the nuances between images and text.

Click here for event details! This is a free event, and a 10% book discount will be offered to all attendees.

JANET LAURENCE

JANET LAURENCE is featured in the book Un Art Écologique : Création plasticienne et anthropocène by Paul Ardenne.

The book looks at art in the Anthropocene era and how artists are adapting to the demands of sustainable development. Ardenne deals with a number of artists whose work seeks to repair and reestablish a connection with the Earth through “green” forms of artistic expression, and announces a new age in art - Ecological Art.

Laurence is featured alongside artists who work in, and with, nature, develop laboratories, practice recycling and create ephemeral interventions.

The book is available in French here.

Un-art-ecologique book cover.jpg

MURRAY FREDERICKS

Murray Fredericks, ‘Array 11’, 2018, Digital pigment print on cotton rag, ed/7, 120 x 165 cm

Murray Fredericks, ‘Array 11’, 2018, Digital pigment print on cotton rag, ed/7, 120 x 165 cm

MURRAY FREDERICKS is interviewed in this month’s edition of Inside Out Magazine.

“Being isolated for extended periods of time, where your whole world becomes the day and night sky, takes you away from the trivial stresses of daily existence - it's an absolute joy," says Fredericks.

The leading image of the article is his photograph Array 11, which will be on view in our upcoming exhibition of Fredericks works opening 25 June 2019.

More information >

JANET LAURENCE

Now you can listen to JANET LAURENCE and MCA Chief Curator Rachel Kent as they share insights on the making of Janet Laurence: After Nature. With a relationship spanning over two decades, Janet and Rachel explore key ideas that have shaped the artist's practice. During the conversation, they discuss Janet's passion for nature as well as her unique interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to art.

This conversation was part of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia’s public programs for Janet Laurence: After Nature exhibition.

For more information on the exhibition and upcoming events, click here.

Cellular Gardens (Where Breathing Begins) , 2005, installation view,  Janet Laurence: After Nature , Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2019, photograph: Jacquie Manning

Cellular Gardens (Where Breathing Begins), 2005, installation view, Janet Laurence: After Nature, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2019, photograph: Jacquie Manning

JACKY REDGATE

Jacky Redgate, 'Light Throw (Mirrors) Fold - Blue and Black' (detail), 2017, chromogenic photograph handprinted, edition of 3, 185 x 127 cm.

Jacky Redgate, 'Light Throw (Mirrors) Fold - Blue and Black' (detail), 2017, chromogenic photograph handprinted, edition of 3, 185 x 127 cm.

Shaune Lakin, Senior Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia, has analysed JACKY REDGATE's artistic process in an important essay on colour photography for Artlink Magazine.

Lakin writes "Structurally, the negatives (and the positive prints conjured from them by Redgate and [master printer Sandra] Barnard) distil the fundamentals of colour photography: positive and negative, the chemical conversion of colour (and tone) to its complementary. There is also a mimetic aspect to this mirroring: it replicates the perceptual experience of colour in our bodies. The intelligence and rigor of this distillation no doubt reflects Redgate’s long-standing interest in the ways that disciplines such as physics and chemistry have sought to make sense of the sensational properties of colour – how we see it, how it affects us, how it is often difficult to see." .

The March issue of Artlink Magazine is on sale now.

TRACY SARROFF

TRACY SARROFF was recently interviewed by Lee-Ann Joy on Kiss FM’s Forum program.

Sarroff discussed her interactive light-based installation Light Buoys in the Docklands, and her current group exhibition Let There Be Light at the Justin Art House Museum.

Listen here >

Tracy Sarroff, 'Light Buoys', 2017, Docklands, Melbourne. Photograph: John Gollings

Tracy Sarroff, 'Light Buoys', 2017, Docklands, Melbourne. Photograph: John Gollings

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO

The Tate Modern has produced a documentary on MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO.

Major works by Cardoso, including Actual Size I and Actual Size II were acquired last year by the Tate and the Museum of Contemporary Art, as part of a joint acquisition program aimed at bringing Australian art into the international spotlight.

In this film we visit Cardoso’s home and studio to discover more about her work.

Watch the film here >

Maria Fernanda Cardoso,  Actual Size IV Maratus harrissi , 2019, deep focus microscopy, pigment print on premium photo paper, 150 x 190 cm

Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Actual Size IV Maratus harrissi, 2019, deep focus microscopy, pigment print on premium photo paper, 150 x 190 cm

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

Honey Long & Prue Stent,  In Her It , 2018, archival pigment print, edition of 3, 106 x 159 cm

Honey Long & Prue Stent, In Her It, 2018, archival pigment print, edition of 3, 106 x 159 cm

Congratulations to HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT, whose work In Her It is a semi-finalist in the Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize (MCPP).

The MCPP is a national competition that awards and promotes Australian contemporary photography. The Moran Arts Foundation invites photographers to tell a story of how they experience living in Australia; places, people and lifestyle that make our loveable country quintessentially Australian.

More information >

LYNDELL BROWN & CHARLES GREEN | GUAN WEI

Guan Wei,  Gazing Into Deep Space #9 , 2000, acrylic on canvas, 127 x 159 cm (triptych).

Guan Wei, Gazing Into Deep Space #9, 2000, acrylic on canvas, 127 x 159 cm (triptych).

LYNDELL BROWN & CHARLES GREEN and GUAN WEI are featured in Between the Moon and the Stars at the Museum And Art Gallery Northern Territory.

Between the Moon and the Stars explores how the moon and its phases continue to impact on animal and human life. The exhibition includes ancient Aboriginal astronomical knowledge, dreaming stories and the history of stargazing in Australia.

Lyndell Brown & Charles Green,  Wild Nights,  2005, lightjet print on duraclear film, 104 x 107 cm.

Lyndell Brown & Charles Green, Wild Nights, 2005, lightjet print on duraclear film, 104 x 107 cm.

The exhibition continues until 29 March 2020.

More information>