ROSE FARRELL & GEORGE PARKIN

Farrell & Parkin,  Self Portrait #2  from the series  Self Portraits,  2003, Type C Colour photograph, 73 x 76 cm.

Farrell & Parkin, Self Portrait #2 from the series Self Portraits, 2003, Type C Colour photograph, 73 x 76 cm.

ARC ONE Gallery is delighted to present Rose & George, a survey of Rose Farrell & George Parkin’s provocative and visionary collaborative practice.

‘We see ourselves to be one artist with one mind, a total equilibrium.’

–      Rose Farrell & George Parkin, 2010. 

Rose Farrell (1949 – 2015) and George Parkin (1949 – 2012) are recognised nationally and internationally as one of Australia’s most significant and pioneering collaborative artistic partnerships. Their extraordinary vision and united mind pushed the boundaries of photographic portraiture and video art throughout the three decades of their practice.

This exhibition surveys Farrell & Parkin’s oeuvre through selected key works from major series produced between the mid-80s and 2011, including Repentance (1988), Black Room (1992-93), Pulleys, Dislocations and Counterweights (1997-98), A Thousand Golden Remedies (2000), Self Portraits (2003-06), Random Acts (2004), Chinese Self Portraits (2006-09), and their final collaboration, Curious Evolution (2008-11).

Farrell & Parkin,  The Annunciation  from the series  Repentance,  1988, Type C Photograph, 166 x 128 cm.

Farrell & Parkin, The Annunciation from the series Repentance, 1988, Type C Photograph, 166 x 128 cm.

Linking performance, photography, illustration and sculpture, Farrell & Parkin’s elaborately constructed photographic tableaux contemplate the history of the body and mind. Drawing on a myriad of cultural and historical references – from Renaissance and Baroque religious iconography, cinema traditions, myth, and the healing focus of archaic Eastern and Western medical practices and psychiatry – these works explore the mysteries and uncertainties of the human psyche and the fragility of our existence; articulating what Farrell & Parkin have described as, ‘the perilous journey that humans take throughout life’.

Rose Farrell (1949 – 2015) & George Parkin (1949 – 2012) worked collaboratively from 1984 – 2012, creating enigmatic performative photography and video art. Their importance to Australian art history became apparent early in their career with national representation, acquisitions, and exhibitions by major public art institutions in Australia and abroad, including Black Room at the National Gallery of Victoria, 1995, the Scottish International Festival of Photography, 1995, Curious Evolution at Deakin University Gallery, 2015, and Topography of a Collaborative Mind, a major retrospective at Glen Eira City Council Gallery in 2010. Their work was curated into international exhibitions in Canada, France, Russia, Germany, the United States, and Asia, including Photographica Australis, which opened at the National Gallery of Thailand, Bangkok in 2003 and toured through Asia, 2003-04, and Science Fiction at the Singapore Art Museum, 2003. Major group exhibitions include Infinite Conversations: Asian-Australian Exchange, National Gallery of Australia, 2018; Constructed Worlds, National Gallery of Australia, 2011; The Naked Face: Self Portrait, The Ian Potter Centre, NGV Australia, 2010-2011; Role Play: Portrait Photography, NGV International, 2007-08; Heavenly Creatures, Heide Museum of Modern Art, 2004-05; Second Sight: Australian Photography in the NGV, NGV Australia, 2003 and Wall to Wall, National Gallery of Australia, 1998. They held over 50 solo exhibitions and numerous group during their lifetime together.

Farrell & Parkin were the recipients of numerous awards and prizes including the 2005 Josephine Ulrick & Win Schubert Photography Award, Gold Coast City Art Gallery, and in 1992 and 1994 they were the recipients of the Gold Medallion at the International Photographic Salon of Japan in Tokyo. In 2006 they participated in the Red Gate Gallery International Residency Program in Beijing. They received a number of grants including an Arts Victoria, International Program – Export & Touring Grant in 2008 and an Australia China Council Grant in 2007.

Their work is held in major public collections nationally and internationally including Belgium, Canada, Portugal, Scotland, and the United States. Australian collections include the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; and Artbank.

JANET LAURENCE

JANET LAURENCE explores The Johnston Collection alongside her own creative practice in her new installation at Fairhall Exhibition House, titled The Palm at the End of the Mind.


The Johnston Collection encompasses a superb collection of English Georgian, Regency and Louis XV fine and decorative arts, gifted by William Robert Johnston (1911-1986), which are displayed in the domestic setting of his former East Melbourne residence, the 'Fairhall' townhouse.

Janet Laurence has been invited to reconceptualise the Collection with interventions and site-specific installations of her own work within the exhibition house. The results explore the double-edged sense of 'collecting' nature, whether for preservation or extravagance.

Visitors will need to book a tour of the house here.

The exhibition continues until 17 September.

Janet Laurence,  The Palm at the End of the Mind,  installation view courtesy of the The Johnston Collection. Photo: Luts Photography.

Janet Laurence, The Palm at the End of the Mind, installation view courtesy of the The Johnston Collection. Photo: Luts Photography.

JULIE RRAP

Julie Rrap in her Sydney studio. Photo: Jacquie Manning.

Julie Rrap in her Sydney studio. Photo: Jacquie Manning.

JULIE RRAP is featured in the Collector's Dossier in the new issue of Art Collector Magazine, on sale now.

In the feature, Julie discusses her four decades of practice and her upcoming exhibition at ARC ONE, Twisted Logic. The show will feature ambiguous bronze elements, cast from her body, that could be read as either weapons or armour; exploring what Rrap describes as 'that quite slippery relationship between art, culture, and any particular political regime or system that happens to be in power.'

ARC ONE co-director, Fran Clark, who has worked with Rrap since 1999, recalls seeing her work for the first time: 'I was immediately struck by this artist's unique creativity; an artist of intelligence producing strong and iconic art with an excellent grip on that ever-elusive quality, humour.'


Twisted Logic shows at ARC ONE from 3 September - 5 October.

IMANTS TILLERS

IASWASS_Key-Art_billing-block.jpg

This Sunday 21 July at 4pm, Cinema Nova is screening It All Started With A Stale Sandwich, followed by a Q&A with its director and special guests.

The film is an insightful documentary celebrating the 50-year history of Kaldor Public Art Projects, from acclaimed film-maker Samantha Lang. Imants Tillers is one of the artists featured in the film. In it he reflects on his 1984 group show at P.S.1 Gallery in New York, An Australian Accent, as well as assisting Christo & Jeanne-Claude with their mammoth project wrapping Little Bay in 1969.

More information >

HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT

Honey Long & Prue Stent, 'Dust Flood', 2018, archival pigment print, 72 x 108 cm.

Honey Long & Prue Stent, 'Dust Flood', 2018, archival pigment print, 72 x 108 cm.

Congratulations to HONEY LONG & PRUE STENT, whose work 'Dust Flood' is a finalist in the 2019 Pro Hart Outback Prize.

This Prize in an annual acquisitive competition for works in any media which reflect the spirit and diversity of the Australian outback. The winning work will be added to the nationally recognised collection of the Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery.

The finalist exhibition will be showcased at BHRAG from 19 July.

More information >

JULIE RRAP

Opening today at Blue Mountains City Art Gallery is the exhibition with every breath, featuring JULIE RRAP's work Blow Back.

with every breath presents work by 15 artists who encourage us to be still, breathe, reflect and listen. The idea of breath is beautifully captured in Julie Rrap’s suite of photographs, Blow Back, where the artist has etched the breath of 33 female artists, friends and contemporaries on the frame’s glass. Five other ARC ONE artists posed as Rrap's subjects in this work!

The exhibition continues until 25 August.

More information >

Interview with the curator >

GUAN WEI

GUAN WEI's large-scale work Revisionary is in the Art Gallery of New South Wales' new exhibition In one drop of water.

Drawing on rich and diverse works of art, primarily from the AGNSW collection, this exhibition explores the poetic, symbolic and social significance of water in Asian art. Revisionary is dominated by an aqueous bright blue plane, symbolising both the heavens and the ocean. The artist has referred to this work as representing a form of last judgement.

The exhibition continues until December 2020.

More information >

Guan Wei,  Revisionary , 1998, 26 panels, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, dimensions variable.

Guan Wei, Revisionary, 1998, 26 panels, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, dimensions variable.

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO

Maria Fernanda Cardoso,  On the Origins of Art I-II  [film still], single channel HD video, hyper realistic sound with tactile dimension, 6:54sec loop

Maria Fernanda Cardoso, On the Origins of Art I-II [film still], single channel HD video, hyper realistic sound with tactile dimension, 6:54sec loop

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO's video installation On the Origins of Art I-II is now on show at the MCA in their new exhibition The lover circles his own heart. The exhibition presents artworks from the MCA collection that deal with the theme of relationships.

The subject of Cardoso's video work is the Maratus, a tiny Australian spider commonly known as the peacock spider. The artist has recorded their ostentatious mating ritual using HD macro cinematography and a laser vibrometer, capturing the male spider's colourful dance and the distinctive beat it makes with its vibrating abdomen. With this work, Cardoso argues that humans are not alone in their production and appreciation of the arts – the spider's complex system of courtship has, after all, created a discerning aesthetic sense among the females, who will either choose or reject the male based on his choreographed performance!

The exhibition continues at the MCA until 22 September.

More information >

JOHN YOUNG

Young studio.jpeg

The Australian Tapestry Workshop is hosting an exclusive visit to the studio of JOHN YOUNG next Tuesday 2 July at 5.30pm.

Young has collaborated with ATW on two significant tapestries, 'Open World' (2005) and 'Finding Kenneth Myer' (2011). Join the artist on a tour of his studio, and to learn more about his practice and recent projects and exhibitions.

Book now to secure your spot!

More information >

JOHN DAVIS | ROBERT OWEN

Robert Owen,  Origami #8 , 1992, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 122 cm

Robert Owen, Origami #8, 1992, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 122 cm

Melbourne Modern: European art and design at RMIT since 1945, curated by Jane Eckett and Harriet Edquist, is now open at RMIT Gallery, featuring the work of ROBERT OWEN and JOHN DAVIS.


In the wake of WWII, hundreds of exiled and displaced European artists, architects and designers arrived in Melbourne and sought employment with RMIT. Melbourne Modern traces a legacy of European intervention and interdisciplinarity through successive generations of RMIT teachers and students to the present day.

The exhibition continues until 17 August.

More information >

IMANTS TILLERS

Still from the film  Thrown Into The World.

Still from the film Thrown Into The World.

Thrown into the World is a feature-length documentary on the life and work of IMANTS TILLERS. The film offers a unique insight into Tillers' creative process and cross-cultural identity.

Thrown into the World will be screened at Parliament House in Canberra at 2pm today, followed by a Q&A with with Imants and Justine Van Mourik, Director of the Parliament House Art Collection.

Watch the trailer here, and read more about the Canberra premiere here.

LYDIA WEGNER

Lydia Wegner,  Sliding Yellow , 2019, archival inkjet print, 100 x 67 cm.

Lydia Wegner, Sliding Yellow, 2019, archival inkjet print, 100 x 67 cm.

LYDIA WEGNER is speaking at the MGA alongside fellow exhibiting artist Lauren Bamford and Senior Curator Pippa Milne to discuss the concept and process behind the commission Robin Boyd: Portrait of an Australian House.

The resulting new work is presented with a unique architectural intervention in the MGA gallery.

The artist talk will take place this Saturday 15 June between 2 - 3 pm. The exhibition continues until 12 July.

The event is free, but do register here.

JULIE RRAP

Julie Rrap, ‘Stepping Out,’ 2012, bronze and metallic paint, 16 x 25 x 28 cm

Julie Rrap, ‘Stepping Out,’ 2012, bronze and metallic paint, 16 x 25 x 28 cm

JULIE RRAP's work Stepping Out is included in Simon Denny's exhibition Mine opening at MONA tomorrow. The exhibition revolves around mining as a reflection of hope and anxiety about the environment, technology, and development.

Stepping Out recalls Rrap's iconic foot image Overstepping (2001). In both works she extends an image of her feet, transforming them into a pair of stiletto heels. Rrap's high-heeled feet represent a futuristic speculation on where genetic engineering and cosmetic surgery may lead us.

This exhibition opening is part of the Dark Mofo programme. It will continue into the evening, with live music from 4pm.

EUGENIA RASKOPOULOS

in a word untitled #1,  2004, marble, 193.5 x 71.5 x 3 cm;  Un(truth),  2019, reflective vinyl, 578 x 358.5 cm. Installation view at Campbelltown Arts Centre; photo courtesy of the C-A-C.

in a word untitled #1, 2004, marble, 193.5 x 71.5 x 3 cm; Un(truth), 2019, reflective vinyl, 578 x 358.5 cm. Installation view at Campbelltown Arts Centre; photo courtesy of the C-A-C.


EUGENIA RASKOPOULOS is exhibiting a newly commissioned work in OK Democracy, We Need To Talk at Campbelltown Arts Centre (C-A-C), alongside an existing work. 


OK Democracy, We Need to Talk is a conversation and a provocation that suggests an ambition for change through the exploration of how democracy is performed in its current state. Reflecting on the current state of democracy in Australia and around the world, the exhibition presents an open discussion about democracy and its future – or potentially – its demise.

Raskopoulos worked with journalist Peter Greste on her new work Un(truth), which focuses on journalists who have lost their lives in search of democracy and freedom of speech. Mirrored letters run down the gallery wall, forming the names of 54 journalists who were killed in 2018. This work is paired with an older piece, In a word, a marble slab inscribed with the word DEMOCRACY in Ancient Greek. The marble sits on the floor as if dropped from above and suggests a broken or unstable system. "I equate democracy with a sense of freedom, a sense of equality, but I feel neither of these are accurate descriptions of democracy in this day," Raskopoulos said.

The exhibition continues until 31 July.

MURRAY FREDERICKS

Murray Fredericks,  Array 8 , 2018, digital pigment print on cotton rag, 120 x 170 cm

Murray Fredericks, Array 8, 2018, digital pigment print on cotton rag, 120 x 170 cm

MURRAY FREDERICKS has a large feature in the latest edition of Artist Profile magazine. Fredericks touches on his formal influences, his process, and his ongoing relationship with Lake Eyre. 

"The geometry goes back to the Bechers, and Donald Judd in minimalism. One of the criticisms of that minimalism is that it's detached and cold. I look at this as minimalist work but overlaying it with emotion and re-overlaying with a political message...What I am looking at is anything in the landscape that is used to quantify the viewer's experience. Out there it is about setting up where perspective and scale are denied. That is where I am trying to find abstraction," says Fredericks.

Issue 47 of Artist Profile is in stores now and the profile will be online in the weeks to come.


GUO JIAN

Guo Jian,  The Square , 2014.

Guo Jian, The Square, 2014.

GUO JIAN was detained in China over his controversial model of Tiananmen Square in 2014. The Square saw a diorama mired by war, and covered in raw pork mince; a representation of the sights and smells of Tiananmen. Now in Australia, Guo is remaking the model to mark 30 years since the massacre. It will be exhibited later this year. 

Guo Jian explains that "My art is my power, I can send a message to people through it and I want people to know I will never forget what happened at Tiananmen Square." And further that "Tiananmen has become a symbol of China’s power; no-one can touch it - but I wanted to make the diorama show that it will rot."

Read more about Guo Jian's experiences as a Tiananmen Square protester and his remaking of The Square via the links below.

SBS News Article>

Crikey Article>

CYRUS TANG | ANNE ZAHALKA

Cyrus Tang,  Golden Hour - Summer Snow - 108 mins , 2018, archival pigment print, 65 x 65 cm.

Cyrus Tang, Golden Hour - Summer Snow - 108 mins, 2018, archival pigment print, 65 x 65 cm.

Congratulations to CYRUS TANG and ANNE ZAHALKA, finalists in the 2019 Olive Cotton Award for photographic portraiture. 


The finalist exhibition will open on 12 July and continue until 22 September, with the winner announced at the exhibition opening at Tweed Regional Gallery on Saturday 13 July at 5pm.

More information >

Anne Zahalka,  The Ambassadors , 2017, pigment ink on canvas, 124 x 94.4 cm.

Anne Zahalka, The Ambassadors, 2017, pigment ink on canvas, 124 x 94.4 cm.

SAM SHMITH

Sam Shmith,  Untitled (figure, glass, landscape / consecutive) , 2019, pigment print on paper, diptych, sheet: 168 x 110 cm, each, 168 x 220 cm, overall.

Sam Shmith, Untitled (figure, glass, landscape / consecutive), 2019, pigment print on paper, diptych, sheet: 168 x 110 cm, each, 168 x 220 cm, overall.

ARC ONE is delighted to present the sacredness of something, the latest solo exhibition by New York-based artist Sam Shmith.

One possible description of life in the era of digital capitalism is an unwitting, machine-driven conspiracy against the act of concentration. As ever smaller fractions of our attention become monetised, the competition for them increases in speed and aggression. And as ever subtler means are employed to win those fractions from us, our capacity to even discern what it is we are paying attention to is frequently overwhelmed. In this onslaught of distraction, we either try to will our brains to operate at digital speeds or shut down and dissociate. Most of us do some of both. Lost in the space between these two reactions is the environment of mind that permits us to focus and to reflect and to feel.

One possible description of Sam Shmith’s artworks is as the distillation of a sustained effort, despite these forces, to focus and reflect. As such, they are a means for us to do the same. To slow our minds to the point of seeing rather than just looking. To neither consume in haste nor fall asleep, but instead be awake and open and newly alive to the old experience of wonder. This is no small accomplishment.

the sacredness of something... is a selection of large-format works on paper from the last three years of Shmith’s work. One imperfect way of categorising them is to distinguish between what we might call the transit images and the scale images. The former, which constitute the plurality of this exhibit, are a kind of hybrid of landscape and figure. Passengers on what appear to be commuter trains are captured in refections on the glass of the windows they sit opposite. While these figures are the centres of visual gravity, the place our eye is eventually drawn, their almost ghost-like figures are subsumed in the much larger field of the passing landscape seen out through the window of the moving train and the play of light it creates on the glass. Foreground, figure, and background are less defined spaces than the slightly blurred layering of all three in motion. The seemingly mundane subject of a commute is rendered existential.

The scale images, on the other hand, are of massive distant landscapes—a city from above, the sky, the stars—as seen through the minute detail of filters very close to the eye: the plastic of an airplane window or a simple sheet of glass. While there are no human figures in these works there is a strong sense of the implied human viewer, the person glimpsing vastness through the grain of the vanishingly small. The play here is precisely this shifting back and forth that the images produce in us between the scale of the infinite and the scale of that which is so close to us it is almost invisible. The pictures imply that there is a relationship, an interconnectedness between these two registers that we are habitually missing. And so instead of being conventional images of grand vistas that suggest wonder without the power any longer to produce it, these pictures manage to capture the mind itself in the process of looking. And this, almost miraculously, returns our wonder at the scale of the world back to us from beneath the clichés under which it has been buried.

- Adam Haslett,

Images of the Mind (excerpt), 2019

Sam Shmith,  Untitled (glass, sky) , 2019, pigment print on paper, sheet: 230 x 150 cm

Sam Shmith, Untitled (glass, sky), 2019, pigment print on paper, sheet: 230 x 150 cm

Sam Shmith (b. London, 1980) is an Australian artist based in Melbourne and New York. He has held seven solo exhibitions since graduating from RMIT, Melbourne in 2005. Shmith moved to New York in 2012, where he worked as studio director for the artist Adam Pendleton.

Shmith has been curated into several group shows including Photography 130: 130 years of RMIT Photography (RMIT University Gallery, Melbourne, 2017); Gifted Artists (National Gallery of Australia, 2014); and Light Works (National Gallery of Victoria, 2012). His work has been acquired into several major collections including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra, Patrick Corrigan Collection, Murray Art Museum, Artbank, and Macquarie Group Collection, as well as private collections throughout Australia and the United Kingdom.

Shmith was the winner of the Macquarie Group Emerging Artist Prize and the Patrick Corrigan AM Acquisitive Award. His work was acquired by the Murray Art Museum in their National Photography Prize. Shmith has been a recipient of development grants through both the Australia Council for the Arts and Arts Victoria. He has been offered residency fellow positions at the Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts, New York and the BSA Ralph Woodford Residency, NSW. Shmith has been a fnalist in several prestigious visual arts awards including the Josephine Ulrick & Win Schubert Photography Award, the William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize, the Fleurieu Art Prize for Landscape, the Blake Prize for Religious and Spiritual Art, and the Albury Art Prize.

_

The artist wishes to thank the Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts, New York and the BSA Ralph Woodford Residency, NSW for their support during the development of this exhibition.

LYDIA WEGNER

Lydia Wegner, ‘Kitchen Grid’, 2019, archival inkjet, 100 x 67cm

Lydia Wegner, ‘Kitchen Grid’, 2019, archival inkjet, 100 x 67cm

LYDIA WEGNER has been commissioned to produce a series of new works centred on the Wright House in Warrandyte, one of Robin Boyd's iconic family homes. Curated by Pippa Milne, the exhibition Robin Boyd, a portrait of an Australian house celebrates the architecture of Robin Boyd through the medium of photography.

"Lauren Bamford and Lydia Wegner approach the subject of a Boyd house with very different lenses, bringing an energising and intensely new way of seeing this now classic architecture – which was iconoclastic in its day. Wegner brings an eye of abstraction to elicit something unexpected from the familiar architecture, while Bamford masterfully draws out the spirit and joy of a space as a living thing. This newly commissioned work, together with a fabulous swathe of vintage prints of Boyd homes, aims to show just how many ways there are to see and occupy a Boyd house," says Milne.


The exhibition continues until 14 July at the Monash Gallery of Art (MGA).

More information >

JANET LAURENCE

Janet Laurence, photographed in her studio by Jacquie Manning.

Janet Laurence, photographed in her studio by Jacquie Manning.

JANET LAURENCE is interviewed in this month's issue of Vogue Living, where she discusses her MCA show 'After Nature' and her past and present work.

In the article Janet delves into her formative time at an Italian art school in the 70s, her job as a flying artist with Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, and the discordance between European agricultural practices and the Australian landscape.

"[The alarming thing was that our approach] to art was the exactly same approach to farming - people just applied a European perception to the landscape. They didn’t actually look at it how it was, but they were just painting it through the eyes of a European Impressionist. So that was kind of funny and I realised that we can’t see what this place is. So, then I just decided I wanted to start exploring it a bit more and art was a great means for doing that," Laurence says.

'After Nature' continues at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia until 10 June.

Read the full article here >